Relocation

Finance, however, was no barrier to God. The shop underneath the hall had by this time changed hands, with the proprietor trading under the name of Estelle Modes, selling prestigious gowns and dresses for ladies. The business, just like attendance at Cromwell Hall above the shop was also booming. More space was desperately needed to store stock, as well as a sewing room to make new garments, and so the assembly were given notice to quit the room.

The owner of Estelle Modes could not wait until funds were available and a new hall was built or purchased, and so from the start of 1958, the assembly were forced to move into temporary accommodation, initially in the Wesleyan Mission which had closed down, situated on the corner of Chapel Street and Rostron Street. This is where the assembly had hoped to settle; however the size made many uneasy about purchasing the property. After approximately six months at the Wesleyan Mission, the assembly once more relocated, this time on to the main Stockport Road, hiring a room in the Town Hall. Midweek prayer meetings were held at the Baptist Church, Essex Street; the road later being renamed as Elmsworth Avenue.

During their short stay in the Wesleyan Mission, it was decided to embark on building a new hall, with the help of assemblies throughout the country. With the rented room being incorporated back into Estelle Modes, and not used as a separate building, the name of Cromwell Hall was available to be transferred to the new hall, which it was; hence the new hall was not called Marshall Hall or Levenshulme Gospel Hall.

Once all possible sites had been considered, a piece of land in Marshall Road, which had never been built upon was selected, despite reservations that to reach the new hall, many Sunday School children would have to cross Stockport Road, which was becoming increasingly busier.

The land was bought, and even before building work could commence, the assembly had received an unsolicited offer to purchase the land for residential development. Nothing but a House of God was going to be built there!

The local paper at the time reported, "Work on a new £5,000 building is now well under way at Marshall Road, Levenshulme. This building - the new Cromwell Hall - is expected to be completed and opened sometime this summer.

More than 40 years ago, a few Christians rented a hall at the comer of Cromwell Grove and Stockport Road for the purpose of preaching the Gospel. Cromwell Hall was born.

Since then, it has sought to return to the 'kind of simplicity found in the churches of New Testament times'.

At the end of 1957, it was necessary to leave the Cromwell Grove premises and, since then, plans for a new and better building have been drawn up. In the meantime, meetings have been held at Levenshulme Town Hall.

The new hall in Marshall Road will have accommodation for about 200 people and is being built entirely from voluntary subscriptions, without recourse to the usual methods of raising funds.

The total cost of the building and its furnishings is expected to be just over £5,000 and the Christians who will meet there emphasise their belief that 'God dwelleth not in temples made with hands' and that the church is not the building but the company of Christians who meet there."

Building the new hall was just like any other building project - fraught with problems! Work began in the Spring of 1959, but not until after the assembly learnt that the main contractor was experiencing financial difficulties and was forced to transfer the contract to one of his sons.

Although Tom Shepherd and Benjamin Waterhouse put a great amount of effort and work into the new building, especially as Mr. Waterhouse was the main architect assisted by his son John, neither gentleman saw the completed building both died while the construction took place.

Would, after all these setbacks, the hall be ready for September? It needed to be - a wedding was due to take place.

History | Estelle Modes | RELOCATION | Marshall Road | Golden Jubilee | Anniversary Address

© Cromwell Hall Christian Fellowship 2003-2018